Tag Archive | weight

Benefits Of TLS Protein Shakes

Benefits Of TLS Protein Shakes

TLS Nutrition Shakes provide a great nutritional alternative for active lifestyles. Available in two delicious flavors, TLS Nutrition Shakes are formulated to deliver an optimal balance of protein, carbohydrates and fats in every serving, along with 10 grams of fiber and over one-third the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of fiber and 22 different vitamins and minerals — all with just six grams of fat per serving!

Whether you want to lose weight or build lean muscle, TLS Nutrition Shakes provide a quick and easy snack between meals to satisfy hunger, and an alternative to fast food. As an excellent source of protein, and with 10 grams of fiber per serving, TLS Nutrition Shakes deliver the energy and nutrition you need.
Primary Benefits of TLS Nutrition Shakes:

Provides 18 grams of protein per serving
Provides 10 grams of fiber per serving
Provides over one-third the RDA of 22 vitamins and minerals per serving
No added sugar
Great taste

4 Top Health Benefits of Garlic

“With their unique combination of flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients, allium vegetables—such as garlic—belong in your diet on a regular basis. There’s research evidence for including at least one serving of an allium vegetable—such as garlic—in your meal plan every day. If you’re choosing garlic as your allium family vegetable, try to include at least 1/2 clove in your individual food portion. If you’re preparing a recipe, we recommend at least 1-2 cloves.

Garlic is a wonderful seasoning to add aroma, taste, and added nutrition to your dishes. We often recommend using raw chopped or pressed garlic in many of our dishes to take advantage of the benefits derived from garlic. However, if you cannot tolerate raw garlic, you can add chopped garlic to foods while they are cooking. It is best to add it towards the end of the cooking process to retain the maximum amount of flavor and nutrition.”

Via whfoods.com

Garlic owes its smell to a sulfur compound. The fact that it stinks isn’t unique– sulfur compounds are renowned for their nasty odors. In fact, sulfur compounds in intestinal gas are responsible for the smell of flatulence. Those sulfur compounds are pretty potent stuff, considering that they make up just one percent of the total intestinal gas released!

Health Benefits of Garlic

1.  Garlic reduces Cholesterol:

There many studies that confirm that garlic in several forms can reduce cholesterol. One reference is: Silagy CS, Neil HAW, 1994, The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians, Vol 28 No 1:39-45

2.  Garlic is an Healthy Aphrodisiac!

Tibetan monks were forbidden from entering the monasteries if they had eaten garlic.
It stirs up passions due to it’s ability to increase the circulation.

3. Garlic is an Anti-oxidant:

Researchers have widely believed that the organic compound, allicin, which gives garlic its aroma and flavour, acts as the world’s most powerful antioxidant. But until now it hasn’t been clear how allicin works, or how it stacks up compared to more common antioxidants such as Vitamin E and coenzyme…Research Sheds Light on Health Benefits of Garlic

Traditional Chinese medicine have used garlic for more than 3,000 years.  Current research is trying to determine the role it could play in treating many health problems such as heart disease and stroke to possibly helping to prevent cancer and increasing your immune system.

4.  Garlic is an Anti-biotic:

The allicin in garlic is also a powerful anti-biolic , which fights infection and bacteria. British researchers gave 146 people either a placebo or a garlic extract for 12 weeks; the garlic takers were two-thirds less likely to catch a cold. Other studies suggest that garlic lovers who chow more than six cloves a week have a 30% lower rate of colorectal cancer and a 50% lower rate of stomach cancer.Garlic helps to open clogged sinuses.

We ate lots of garlic in my home…my father would grow it and it went in everything. He would make garlic sandwiches which we all loved to eat. Toast with butter and chopped garlic and a sprinkle of salt mmmm it was yummy. There were 3 girls in our family and my father used to love to tell us that the garlic would grow hair on our chests!  Diana Herrington

garlic has unique health benefits

Garlic History

  • Once upon a time it was used as currency.
  • In the days of the pharaohs, ancient Egyptians considered garlic so valuable that they placed it in tombs, including in King Tut’s.
  • Ancient Greeks gave it to Olympian athletes for strength and stamina.
  • In India, 5,000-year-old Sanskrit records describe its curative properties.

Why you should let Garlic sit for 5 – 10 minutes?

To get most health benefits from Garlic, let it sit for a minimum of 5 minutes, after cutting and before eating or cooking.  Waiting 5 – 10 minutes allows the health-promoting allicin to form.  If you do not let it sit, allicin is never formed, so it is worth the wait. What is Allicin?

I was having dinner with some friends one evening. My friend, Catherine had made a stir fry with lots of garlic in it; she told me that she could only eat organic garlic as when she ate non-organic garlic she would have extreme digestive problems.

Ultimate Garlic Recipe:Simple Garlic Zucchini

The zucchini for some is just an excuse for all the garlic but in any case, it’s a heavenly combination.

Ingredients:

2 large zucchinis
10 cloves of garlic*
Almond oil
Sea salt

Directions:

  1. Grate 2 large zucchinis.
  2. Chop 10 cloves of garlic
  3. Sauté zucchini and garlic in almond oil till soft for 5 minutes.
  4. Add salt

Foods That Make You Feel Better

Superfoods that heal

 

Norine Dworkin-McDaniel

 

Once upon a time, food as medicine wasn’t such a strange idea—Hippocrates himself vouched for it. And while you may not expect your meals to hold as much importance in an era when doctors can do face transplants, food is still vital for mental and physical well-being. “Our bodies have a remarkable capacity to heal, and what we eat can help with that,” says Travis Stork, MD, co-host of The Doctors and a practicing board-certified emergency-medicine physician. The thought that diet enhances mood and wellness may be age-old, but the scientific proof is brand-new. So turn your grocery list into an Rx for what ails you, using this latest research as your guide.

Curb heartburn: Whole grains and fiber

 

‘Tis the season for overindulging—and heartburn. But adding in more veggies and replacing refined grains like white rice and pasta with their whole-wheat counterparts might help you survive the holidays reflux-free. The secret? The high insoluble-fiber content gets things moving, explains Ronald Primas, MD, clinical instructor of medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, in New York City: “The more fiber you eat, the less time food spends in the stomach, which helps keep food and acid from coming back up.”

Survive cold season: Tuna, halibut, turkey

 

Don’t subsist only on salads during the winter months. Getting an insufficient amount of selenium can mean that you’re missing out on a key player in immune function. Selenium helps build up white blood cells—particularly those responsible for killing bacteria and viruses, even the flu. Animal studies have shown that selenium deficiency not only leads to more severe flu symptoms but also enables mild flu viruses to mutate into more virulent strains. Just one serving of halibut or sardines gives you more than 60 percent of your RDA and provides you with mood-boosting omega-3 fatty acids.

Survive cold season: Fermented foods

 

What do yogurt, kimchi (Korean cabbage), kefir (a fermented milk drink), miso and tempeh (made from fermented soybeans) have in common? They all contain beneficial bacteria, aka probiotics, which can help keep your immune system strong, explains Siona Sammartino, a nutritionist and natural foods chef in Seattle, WA. A Swedish study found that having a daily probiotic drink cut workplace sick days by 55 percent. And a Cochrane meta-analysis of 10 studies found that probiotics worked better than placebos for reducing upper respiratory infections. Not into yogurt? Say cheese: Many aged raw-milk cheeses (such as Edam, Gouda or feta) are good sources of probiotics, notes Sammartino.

Survive cold season: Kale, spinach, yams, pumpkin, carrots

 

Vitamin A is the VIP here, keeping mucous membranes moist and healthy so germs can’t get past them, says David Katz, MD, founder of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and author of Disease-Proof: The Remarkable Truth About What Makes Us Well.

Soothe joint and muscle pain: Fatty fish

 

It’s like oil in the Tin Man’s joints: The omega-3 fatty acids in fish such as salmon and sardines can help get stiff knees working again. A recent meta-analysis of research found that taking omega-3s daily reduced joint pain and a.m. stiffness enough to allow patients with rheumatoid arthritis to reduce NSAID use.

Soothe joint and muscle pain: Tart cherries

 

Athletes swear by the anti-inflammatory powers of tangy “sour-pie” cherry juice to reduce after-workout soreness. In a study from Oregon Health & Science University, runners who drank 12 ounces of the tart stuff twice daily for a week before a race (plus on the day of the event) reported less post-run pain than those who had a cherry-flavored placebo drink.

Clear allergy fog: Nuts and seeds

 

Got itchy eyes and sneezing fits? Make like a squirrel and stock up on nuts and seeds. Almonds, peanuts and sunflower seeds (and even some vegetables) are chock-full of vitamin E, which studies suggest may help reduce the allergic response, explains Today show nutrition expert Joy Bauer, RD. A German study found that people with diets high in vitamin E had a lower risk of hay fever than those who weren’t getting as much of it. The RDA for adults is 15mg, the amount in about 2 ounces of sunflower seeds—perfect for powering up a salad.

Clear allergy fog: Berries, apples, onions

 

Consider these foods a garden-variety allergy pill. It’s thanks to a compound called quercetin, which has shown promise in test-tube studies done at Tufts University for preventing immune cells from releasing the histamines that cause those familiar symptoms.

Fight a UTI: Parsley tea

 

Lab research suggests why you should eat the parsley-sprig garnish on your plate (and then some): It’s been shown to be an antibacterial force against the germs that cause urinary tract infections—even some of those that have demonstrated resistance to antibiotics. Next time you feel the dreaded twinge of a UTI, try this: Boil some water, steep a bunch of parsley in it for 10 minutes and then drink up, recommends Param Dedhia, MD, internal-medicine physician at Canyon Ranch Resort and Spa, in Tucson, Ariz. Repeat throughout the day.

Fight a UTI: Cranberry juice

 

It’s not merely a sweet mixer for boozy beverages. Studies show that the go-to preventive remedy for UTIs isn’t just the stuff of folklore. Past research has focused on compounds in cranberries (and blueberries) called proanthocyanidins, which were found to keep bacteria from attaching to bladder cells and causing infection. Now new research from McGill University demonstrates yet another way that the humble cranberry may be a woman’s best friend: “In lab studies, cranberry prevented the bacteria from producing a specific protein called flagellin, which is necessary for growing the tails that enable them to swim up the urinary tract and attach to cells,” explains lead study author Nathalie Tufenkji, PhD. Look for products with cranberry juice listed in the first three ingredients.

 

 

 

 

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